IBM Fellow Irene Greif Retires – A Pioneer in Building a Workplace that Works

Irene Greif, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business (Photo Credit:  Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

Irene Greif, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business (Photo Credit: Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

IBM Fellow Irene Greif is retiring after more than 25 years with Lotus Development Corporation (where she was head of Research) and IBM. At IBM, she went on to create the Center for Social Business, a global research effort on reinventing the way people work. Along the way, these teams built the foundations of Lotus Sametime and IBM Connections, and revamped email to be the social tool it is today.

Irene began her journey into the workplace of the future while at MIT. Trained as a computer scientist, she was attracted to challenges of communication and collaboration – regardless of underlying technologies. In the 1980s, questions raised by Doug Engelbart’s 1968 Mother of All Demos, such as why some inventions (the mouse) took off, and others (video conferencing and shared screens) were still being reinvented in research labs, led her to study the opportunities – and limits – for office automation solutions. She founded the field of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) in 1984 to help computer scientists and social scientists join forces to understand “how collaborative activities and their coordination can be supported by means of computer systems.”

Irene’s pioneering work changed how technology helps us work, and work together. She reflects on the inspiration to make these tools – and inspiring others to do the same.

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What were the workplace tools like when you started your career?

When I was on the faculty at MIT in the late 1970s and early 80s, office automation was the big thing. But the most interesting technologies being used beyond email were still stuck in research labs. At work, the personal computer – loaded with spreadsheet software, usually Lotus 1-2-3 at the time – was cropping up all over the place, outside IT control. And the question of which word processor to adopt was the next big issue.

Local areas networks were just being installed and slowly replacing “sneakernet” for transferring files. So, there was a lot of opportunity for change. What’s more, since researchers who were inventing new tools for collaboration were looking for realistic test beds outside their labs, it was a great time for a researcher to move into a business setting – that’s where the action was going to be.

How has CSCW evolved since the 1980s?

I started the research field of CSCW before joining IBM, but it fit right into what Lotus (and later IBM) was doing with group support systems. I’ve had the chance to keep reinventing workplace solutions – and recreating CSCW teams – ever since.

In the 1980s, group support systems such as online forms and formal networked processes (to pass information around without printing it or carry floppy disks in our pockets) were still new. Also new were anthropologists studying office life and culture. They found that office work was rarely done according to formal written processes. So, when companies built formal processes into online systems, informal actions, such as just knowing who else was in an approval chain when a manager was on vacation, were ignored.

Working with anthropologists helped us look beyond the technology, and brought social science and computer science together on the team.

How has CSCW impacted design? 

This “observe first” approach led us to reinventing email. We discovered that people hacked together ways to manage their lives around their email. It wasn’t just for messages; they used it for reminders and calendar appointments – well before these functions were built into any email platform.

We set out to design an email system that reflected what people were actually trying to do with it. We used our research to make subtle adjustments, integrating new features into Lotus Notes and providing the rich context that now integrates presence, threading, calendars, and instant messaging.

How else were new ideas by designers and developers meshed with what was being observed?

We also kept an eye on the consumer space to ask “would any of those tools be useful in business communications?” For example, chat apps were popular with kids in the 1990s, and that initially made it a challenge to pitch as a business opportunity. So, we used design through storytelling to prove that it could be useful. Our storyboard showed how customer support could “chat” with experts to help solve a technical issue – while staying on the phone with the customer and providing answers seamlessly. This was the origin of Sametime, the ubiquitous tool that IBMers rely on today.

We’ve been fortunate to work with an extremely open and creative corporate IT department that supports experimentation inside IBM. As a result, we can deploy and observe prototypes inside our really large company. And in some cases, the most important inventions were by the crowd – our users – and not our teams.

We’ve taken a similar approach outside IBM on the internet with projects such as Many Eyes. Launched in 2007, we wanted to know how people would use a visual analytics tool. It’s been active for years and in fact, the users pushed us from numerical to text visualizations that were invented and installed on the site. Many Eyes technology has since been transferred to a product team. Version two was released this year.

What’s next in workplace collaboration technology?

What’s next, in my opinion, is less about technology, and more about design. In fact, at this year’s CSCW conference, the new “Lasting Impact” award will be given to a 1988 paper about why group systems fail. The insight still proves true today: the cost-benefit balance of a tool is often wrong, or not accounted for, in the design phase. If you’re building a new workplace app, some people are likely to benefit more than others. You need to take that into account – either increase benefits to all, or make it particularly appealing for the “helpers” to participate.

Every one of my teams has had computer scientists, social scientists, developers and designers. And we have tried to apply this benefit thought in our designs. The simplest way is to try to assure there is personal value to each participant, even before they realize any benefit from sharing. This approach helped us get buy-in, for example, to add IBM Connections’ shared bookmarks feature. It gets everyone’s bookmarks out of a browser, and into a community of people who will also find them useful.

Since I’m betting on a better design – more user-centered and culturally aware design – as the most important ingredient, I’d like to say just how thrilled I am to see IBM’s renewed focus in design. Their design thinking is close to my heart, based on rich stories and deep understanding of not just how something is used, but why it would be used in the first place.

What has it meant to you to be a “trailblazing” woman in technology?

I sometimes envy the women who came up the technical career ranks after me because they had other women to talk to, and share stories with – something I didn’t have when I was a graduate student. It’s important for me, and others who were “firsts” in their fields, to participate in communities like the Anita Borg Institute. Today, as we see more and more women blazing trails, I remind them to look around and talk to other women while they are in the process.

Regarding mentoring, while having a formal mentor is important, don’t discount your second and third degree connections, who can offer you what I often call meaningful “mentoring moments.” Some of the colleagues I’ve sought out for advice never knew in the moment that their opinions played a role in something that amounted to a critical decision for me.

This kind of interaction is supported in social networking theory: it’s not the people you talk to everyday, but it’s those you reach out to who will have new, and maybe the best, insights.

What are some of your plans after retirement?

The great thing is that I don’t have to have a plan. I never really had a plan for my career, but rather let it evolve and I expect to do the same now. I would like to spend more time on STEM education, mentoring and volunteering, and working with organizations such as the National Academy of Engineering.

And I’ll continue to knit, though maybe now I’ll find time to organize the mess of yarn I’ve collected over the years.

(Video credit: IBM Social Business)

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection via Chris Nay, IBM Research Communications

6 Reasons Why Tweet Chats Are Good for B2B

twitter platform popularity

Graphic Credit: B2B Marketing 2013 Social Media Infographic – What is the B2B social platform of choice for brands?

A Tweet Chat is a real-time chat, often scheduled on a regular day/time that are focused around a certain topic.  It started from the use of hashtags (the pound sign # plus a word, like #socialbusiness) which is how Twitter users signify the topics they are talking about.  Given that the most popular handle on Twitter today is Justin Bieber, why would you want to bother with a Tweet Chat as a professional?  Here are some of the key benefits.

1.  Right platform for B2B conversations

Facebook and YouTube may have the most users, but Twitter and LinkedIn rule the B2B space. While LinkedIn does offer forum type discussion posts within targeted business groups, it is a fairly limited with respect to live chat interactions. Twitter’s open platform makes it easy for businesses and marketers to host regular live chats on business topics to a broad audience (currently 500M+).  The openness of the platform also means there is a plethora of tools available to help you participate, host, promote, moderate, and track your Tweet Chats.  So if you have a business type topic, such as technology, marketing, career advice, leadership, Tweet Chats are your best bet for a live chat model.

2. Follow, not friend – public is the name of the game

On Twitter, you don’t have to ‘friend’ anyone to participate in the chat or reap any of the other benefits noted below.  Simply put, you’re on a social network that’s essentially public, so you can read anyone’s tweets by going to their profile, choose to follow them – or not, and participate in Tweet Chats on topics that interest you anytime without any participation barriers such as registration, approval by chat moderators, etc.  Twitter does provide a function whereby users can restrict their tweets only to an audience that they approve, but it is rarely used since it kind of defeats the purpose of being on Twitter, which is a public social network for all intents and purposes.

3.  Gain new insights

Tweet Chats done well will bring together influencers on a given topic space, so it’s a great opportunity to learn from other influencers, encounter new ideas, and gain insights on the major trends.  People often post links to valuable resources, such as white papers, infographics, and tools related to the topic as well, which can expand your thinking in new directions.  Tweet Chats are also one of the best ways to learn who the influencers in a topic space are.

4. Connect – build your network and extend your reach

Since a Tweet Chat is essentially a gathering of thought leaders on a given topic, it’s also a great way to expand your network and deepen relationships with your target audiences.  You may get new followers simply by showing up to Tweet Chats, but you certainly will gain new advocates if you contribute to the Tweet Chat in ways that are meaningful and relevant to the other participants.  The bonus here is that anytime someone else in the Tweet Chat likes what you say and re-tweets it during the chat, then you’ve also just been exposed to THEIR Twitter followers as well, potentially expanding your reach beyond just the Tweet Chat event.  You’ll come away with new followers who won’t just see your links and posts everyday in their Twitter feed, but they are more likely to re-tweet you after engaging with you in a Tweet Chat.

5. Learn how to stand out

Even if you just watch a Tweet Chat without participating, you’ll quickly learn what type of Tweets are picked up and re-tweeted multiple times.  You can test it yourself by seeing which of your 140 character attempts at insight, advice, factoids, or reference links gets picked up by the crowd.  If you take note of which of your tweets earns the best reactions and which are ignored, you’ll gain insight on how to make your tweets and content as eye-catching as possible.  As you apply this both to your regular Tweets and to any future Tweet Chats you participate in, you’ll start to build your realm of influence as people will see how often you are re-tweeted.

6. Build your authority and loyal advocates

Scientists have discovered that it really only takes 10% of the population to sway the popular opinion.  A Tweet Chat is a great way to share your expertise and thought leadership, build your authority and start engaging with that top 10% of influencers and thought leaders.  As you dialogue and build rapport with them, you will earn their respect and advocacy over time if you demonstrate consistent intelligence and expertise about your topic.  The more original and sound your insights are (as opposed to just re-tweeting others or pushing product), the more you will gain recognition as being a thought leader in your own right.  And, as you grow your network of loyal advocates, your own authority and expert status (influence) on the topic space will also grow because they will listen to what you have to say.

Graphic Credit:  MotiveQuest (based on

Graphic Credit: MotiveQuest (based on study ‘Social consensus through the influence of committed minorities’)

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Related:

- By Julie Yamamoto

IBM Vice President, Gill Zhou, Is a Model for Working Women in China (Ad Age)

Gill Zhou, Vice President Marketing, Communications & Citizenship, IBM Greater China Group

Gill Zhou, Vice President Marketing, Communications & Citizenship, IBM Greater China Group

IBM Vice President, Gill Zhou, was recognized as being one of China’s Women to Watch in September 2012 at a gala event sponsored by Ad Age and Thoughtful China.  The recognition cites Gill as being a role model for Chinese women in business, as evidenced by her 760,000 followers on the Chinese micro-blogging service Sina Weibo (now more than 1M+). Gill is quoted in the article as follows: “As a woman leader, I always have to be conscious that we play multiple roles: professional, daughter, daughter-in-law, wife, mother, parent,” says Ms. Zhou, who often accommodates employees’ family needs by granting them flexibility. “It’s never easy.”   Previously in charge of Communications for IBM Asia Pacific, Ms. Zhou took on the role of leading marketing for IBM China in 2012 after driving double digit growth in the region in 2011.

At the gala event, Ms. Zhou had this thought to share with the event attendees:

“My key takeaway out of my 20 years career in the fast changing industry like IT is you have to choose your battles….but once you define your battles, DO IT with an unwavering focus…”

Ms. Zhou has also been recognized by a number of other organizations.  Prior to joining IBM, she worked at Motorola where she received the “Woman Star of Motorola” award for her role in making the company one of the top 10 brands in China (2000).   In 2004, she was recognized as being one of the top 10 women in China’s IT industry in a program sponsored by the All China Women’s Federation, Ministry of Information Industry and China Computerworld, and was also voted one of the Top 50 most influential women in China by Trends magazine.  More recently, she was a keynote speaker at Working Mother magazine’s ‘Global Advancement of Women‘ conference in Shanghai in 2011 where she spoke on Strategies in Building Your Personal Brand.

Read the full story and learn more about Ms. Zhou below, including some video footage from the event:

(Video credit: Thoughtful China Women to Watch Event)

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

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The January 2013 theme for The Greater IBM Connection is ”leadership”, and The Greater IBM Connection will be sharing various tips, tools, stories, and resources on this topic.

IBM Research Chief Scientist for Social Business, Irene Greif, Wins Technical Leadership Award

Irene Greif, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business (Photo Credit:  Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

Irene Greif, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business (Photo Credit: Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

Irene Greif, IBM Research Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business was awarded The Anita Borg Technical Leadership Award at the 12th annual Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing in October, 2012.  The award recognizes and celebrates an outstanding woman technical leader and was established to honor the legacy of Anita Borg, a significant contributor to advances for women in technology and engineering fields. Recipients are women who have inspired the women’s technology community through outstanding technological and social contributions and through leadership have increased the impact of women on technology.  Irene was recognized for founding the research field of CSCW (Computer-Supported Cooperative Work) and her continued leadership championing this kind of interdisciplinary research in the IBM Center for Social Business.  The Center for Social Business is a global effort to focus IBM’s CSCW and Computer-Human Interaction research on the growing opportunities to transform business practices through social technologies such as crowd-sourcing, social analytics, and interactive visualization. The Center has emphasized research based on large scale deployments of new technologies, providing test beds for studies of adoption rates and impact of social media on organizations. As an example, many of the core capabilities of IBM Connections, IBM’s social software for business that provides a collaborative work environment, was developed by the Center.

Irene has also been recognized by a number of other organizations.  She is a fellow of both the Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM).  Irene was inducted into the Women In Technology International (WITI) Hall of Fame in 2000 and awarded the Women Entrepreneurs in Science and Technology Leadership award in 2008.  In 2010, she was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, and in 2012 she was elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

A full listing of Irene’s publications can be found here, and she also discusses social business in this video interview with IT columnist Lenny Liebmann.

Read the full story and watch Irene’s acceptance speech below:

(Video credit:  Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

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The January 2013 theme for The Greater IBM Connection is ”leadership”, and The Greater IBM Connection will be sharing various tips, tools, stories, and resources on this topic.

New LinkedIn Profile Design – Time To Overhaul Yours? 13 New Tips

new LI profile

In case you missed the news, LinkedIn launched a new profile design in October (here’s a sneak peek).  LinkedIn is arguably the number one social media site for business and professional networking with more than 187 million members in over 200 countries worldwide, as of September 30, 2012.  It’s a hugely popular site and recruiters spend a lot of time looking at user profiles.  Just in time for 2013, here are 13 new ways you can make your LinkedIn profile more irresistible in the new year, whatever your goals may be from Business Insider.  (And when you’re finished polishing your LinkedIn profile, join The Greater IBM Connection group on LinkedIn if you qualify:  http://linkd.in/Ru0wWj).

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For more information:

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

Is Your Job Search Making You Look Out of Date? 5 New Rules You Need to Know

by Susan P. Joyce, career expert, Work Coach Cafe

I hear from many “older” job seekers these days who are frustrated with today’s job search process.  They are convinced that their “advanced age” (30, 40, 50, 60, or more) is causing them problems.  I think they could be right, but NOT, perhaps, for the reason they think…

Although I do not doubt that age discrimination exists, I know that other things could be negatively impacting these people.  It basically comes down to looking – and being - out of date, using old-fashioned job search techniques.

job hunt 685x1024 Top Job Hunting TipsIf you are over 40 or it has been more than 3 years since your last job hunt, you are probably unaware of how much recruiting and hiring practices have changed recentlly, particularly with the growth of social media and also with the tough job market we have been experiencing.

The 5 New Rules of Job Search

Regardless of age, being out-of-date is a very common problem and not, fortunately, an insurmountable one.  Here are some things you can do to address the issue, and become more up-to-date for your job search and your job.

1. Focus!

One of today’s “problems” is too many opportunities!  Studies have shown that we humans are almost paralyzed when we have too many choices – which TV show to watch (when you have hundreds of channels), which coffee to order (when it comes in dozens of variations), and on, and on, and on…

Going to a job board and entering only the location is asking for over-load.  Waaayyy too many choices!  I just typed “Chicago” into Indeed, and it showed me 57,000+ jobs!  Yikes!

To make your job search more effective, focus on 1 or 2 job titles you really want and the employers you would like to work for.

2. Bring Your “A” Game!

The way you handle this whole process of applying and interviewing for a job is viewed as an example of your work – which it is!

Use great care with all of your interactions with an employer or recruiter.  Take the time to craft your best response rather than hurriedly attaching your resume to a one-sentence email with a subject that simply (and very unhelpfully) says, “Resume Attached” or “Applying.”

Standing out from the crowd in a positive way is NOT optional.  Leverage the technology currently available, and you will also prove that you are not out-of-date.

  • Resumes
    Resumes have changed substantially with the availability of technology.  An old-fashioned resume stamps “OUT-OF-DATE” on your forehead! Most employers expect that you can use word processing software well enough to customize your resume and cover letter specifically for them.   Generic work-history resumes don’t often work well today.

  • Networking
    Studies show that the person who is referred by an employee is hired 5 times more often than the stranger who simply applies.  So, focus that networking on your target employers (or a class of employers).

    Find those former colleagues who you worked with well in the past.  Or that great boss you had 2 jobs ago.  Where are they working now?  Are they hiring?

  • Interviewing
    Be very well-prepared.  Expect to be asked, “So, what do you know about us?” and have a good answer ready based on your research on the employer’s website as well as what Google and LinkedIn show you.

  • Prepare positive answers to unusual interview questions, particularly for any “soft spots” you have, like gaps in your employment history, being fired, or anything questionable about your recent work history that could raise concern for an employer. Also, of course, have answers ready for the standard interview questions, like “Why do you want to work here?”  ”Why should we hire you?”

3. Be Visible!

Being invisible is like another OUT-OF-DATE stamp on your forehead!  Employers use search engines to research job applicants more than 80% of the time, according to recent studies.  They are looking for “social proof” that you are who you say you are, have done what you say you have done, would fit in well, and understand how to use the Internet for business.  If they don’t find that corroboration, they move on to the next candidate.

If you Google your name and find nothing about you on the first page or – at a minimum – the first 3 pages, this is a problem! Yes, it is better than having photos of you drunk at a party, but a lack of online visibility brands you as out-of-date (unless you are in some sort of super-secret profession, like spy).

It also makes you vulnerable to mistaken identity.  Oh, that person who has the same name you have and stole money from his or her last employer isn’t you?  An employer doing a quick Google search would not know it wasn’t you, and, most likely, they would not take the time to find out.

4.  Join LinkedIn!

LinkedIn is an excellent venue for managing professional/work visibility.  LinkedIn is usually # 1 – or very near # 1 – on any search of a person’s name on a search engine.  And, YOU control what it tells the world about you!  Your LinkedIn Profile needs to be 100% complete (LinkedIn guides you through that process), and then it will provide much of the “social proof” most employers are seeking.

LinkedIn will help you reconnect with those former colleagues, co-workers, and bosses, and give you opportunities, through Groups and Answers, to demonstrate what you know.

The Greater IBM Connection on LinkedIn

5.  Pay Attention!

Set up a Google Alert on your name.  Pay attention to what is visible about your name when someone does a search.  When something bad appears, you can bury it with other positive content, or you may be able to get it taken down.  If something can’t be removed, be prepared to address it in an interview or, even, in a cover letter or your resume, if appropriate.

Onward!

Catch up with these New Rules so you don’t look out-of-date because looking out-of-date is probably hurting you more than your age.  The good news is that by becoming more up-to-date for your job search, you’ll be more up-to-date for your job!  So, you should be more successful once you land.  We’re never too old to learn something new – it keeps us young!

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Greater IBMers, what would you add to this? Share your lessons learned in the Comments.

What social network do you use the most?

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–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

A Global Candy Store

IBM - apparently, like a candy store

When my friend Suzanne Minassian-Livingston described IBM as “like a candy store” at last year’s Web 2.0 Expo conference in Berlin it immediately struck a chord with me; and I’ve reused her slide (based on a Creative Commons-licensed image from a Flickr contributor) many times over the last year.

One of the things I’ve learned about the company I work for (particularly as a result of getting involved with social software, networks and communities both internally and externally) is the massive diversity the organisation has and the enormous strength that it delivers. It’s a diversity that is constantly being refreshed as new acquisitions are made and new thinking and innovation joins the existing talent pool. It’s a diversity that’s reflected not only in the global nature of the business, but also in the different areas in which the company is engaged – from hardware, software, services, methodologies, research, all kinds of cool thinking. It seems lately that almost every day I meet someone new who has something different to share with me.

Yesterday I was presenting to a customer about what IBM has been doing internally with social networks, and how we collaborate both internally and externally. That brought me back to the diversity slide – the sweet shop, the candy store. What was really cool about that was that it enabled me to tell the story of how I’d widened my network internally, and began to reach out to people across the organisation – making friends in Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Delhi, all over the world as well as around the UK, and from all different areas of the business. One of the things that I learned as part of the briefing the IBM team delivered yesterday was about IBM’s green strategy and Project Big Green – I’d heard about it before and been excited, but I learned a lot from one of our VPs about a number of different client stories where value and environmental improvements have been delivered.

It’s just incredibly exciting. That, and that the fact that there’s always something new to learn, coupled with the rich cultural diversity and the enormous amount of trust that I feel that the organisation places in its employees, is really what makes it such an enjoyable place to work, and that I believe makes it a really strong organisation.

Andy Piper, social bridgebuilder, IBM Hursley

Home: http://andypiper.co.uk | Twitter: @andypiper

Sharing stories to change the world

Expect to be pleasantly surprised if you go looking for ways to make a difference. A couple of years ago I thought it would be a good idea to find and connect with IBMers who were exploring innovative ways to use technology for social good. So, using our social networks I found and ‘friended’ some people around the world using Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on IBM’s community driven social networking sites.

What started as a search for minds that want to use technology to make a difference, turned into whole new way of working and communicating. Driven by a motive to explore the possibilities, I discovered some wonderful people around the globe who find ways to use social media and virtual worlds for communicating, teaching, solving solutions and creating important communities.

I was so inspired, I decided to ask some women from my social network to share short stories about their experiences using the web to change the world for an ebook – Worldshapers. I’m really grateful to the 16 women who shared their stories and I hope you are inspired too.

As one of the contributors Amy Sample Ward shared in the ebook “Online communities aren’t just about finding people from high school. The new wave of online communities are focused on social issues, cause areas, and making social change”.

To me, that’s what creating a Smarter Planet is all about. I’m really enjoying connecting with people around the world who not only think about these things, but also share their ideas so that others can benefit and add value. How about you?

Normalavatar
Jasmin Tragas
IBM (Australia)

aka wonderwebby
@wonderwebby

Your grandmother’s nephew’s sister-in-law’s employee just got smarter

Have you ever wondered if social networks are worth your time?  Maybe you haven’t haven’t had a friend request on Facebook yet from a
distant relative you never met (my husband had a request from his great-grandfather’s best friend’s great-grandson and I had a recent request from my mother’s cousin’s daughter!) Maybe you don’t network with business contacts, new or old on LinkedIn.
Perhaps you are yet to be enlightened on the value of connecting to
hundreds or thousands of “strangers” drip-feeding you one line wonders
on Twitter. But even if you don’t use any social networks, chances are you are still connected to a wealth of people, knowledge and potential.

So what could you do if you formalized’ these connections? Well, you could
start by listening. And then you could share your ideas -  the ideas
that are only
half-baked. Allow other people in the community to fill in the blanks.
Be willing to NOT have all the answers. Get ready to turn your hopes
and ideas into useful, real, intelligent solutions.

To give you an idea of the value in doing this, take a look at this video.

Not only can we help to create a smarter planet – using social networks
for social good – but we can also experience the personal reward of
experiencing great minds and friendships along the way. I know I have through the Greater IBM Connection. Scott Drummond
recently asked “Can you bring together your own first- and second-order networks
around
a topic of community interest and translate your social capital into a
transformative experience?
Incidentally, I met Scott through a former
IBM employee on Twitter. Scott also works for my former employer, and we
are now connected on Facebook! So, What are you waiting for? It’s time for a smarter planet. What might you hope to transform through your social network?

Normalavatar
Jasmin Tragas
Managing Consultant, IBM (Australia)

aka wonderwebby