Engaging People for Smarter Cities, Starting With Waterfront Toronto

smartercities1Waterfront Toronto Taps IBM Intelligent Operations for Major Smarter City Project
Waterfront Toronto, one of the largest waterfront revitalization projects in the world, is using the IBM Intelligent Operations Center delivered as a service on the IBM SmartCloud to help transform city operations to become more efficient.

Working with IBM Business Partner Element Blue, Waterfront Toronto is launching newblueedge.ca, a powerful community portal that residents can use to easily connect with neighbors, businesses, and service providers in the surrounding area to keep up with traffic congestion reports, public transit information, weather and news, as well as post their ideas and thoughts on how to improve the area.  It will use IBM’s cloud computing and social business software, services and technologies, and IBM Intelligent Operations Center (IOC) for Smarter Cities (see demo video below).  Ultimately, newblueedge.ca will serve as the platform for a suite of tools that will help residents make smarter decisions about everything from their daily commute to health and wellness, energy and water use, and more.

About People for Smarter Cities (P4SC)

Waterfront Toronto is the first Canadian community to be featured on IBM’s new global People for Smarter Cities site, a place where residents can conduct meaningful online conversations and contribute original ideas about how to make their cities work smarter.

P4SC will be showcased in other cities as well.  IBM Malaysia announced P4SC to its employees in September and will be sharing it with selected local influencers to encourage participation by them and their local communities.  Looking ahead P4SC also will be showcased at global cities events in Morocco and Spain.

Ready to change cities for the better? Join P4SC and start making a difference!  Share YOUR ideas and join the conversation on the site or on Twitter at #P4SC.

About IBM Smarter Cities Intelligent Operations Software

Cities around the globe are confronted with growing populations, aging infrastructure, reduced budgets, and the challenge of doing more with less.  The IBM Smarter Cities Intelligent Operations software, based on open cloud computing standards, helps transform city operations to become more efficient. Designed in collaboration with city leaders, the software also applies predictive analytics to help cities budget for capital improvements and improve the efficiency of water utilities.  With cloud solutions, cities get started immediately, without specialized hardware or procurement delays, making it possible to begin with small projects and scale across departments using one integrated software system available as a service.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

Calling All Thinkers and Creators – Help Your City Get Smarter (#P4SC)

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Are you a doer, thinker, problem solver, creator or dreamer? Help your city get smarter.

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Giant Fish Sculptures Made from Plastic Bottles in Czech Republic

IBM is helping cities around the world use the vast amount of data, analytics, and information already available to fuel more effective solution ideas from citizens.  In turn, they are helping their city leaders transform their communities.
IBM’s new global People for Smarter Cities site is a place where residents can conduct meaningful online conversations and contribute original ideas about how to make their cities work smarter.

One idea that’s been contributed from Paris, France is for interactive trash bins that encourage Metro passengers to recycle their subway tickets instead of throwing them on the floor.  A little imagination and fun is helping keep the station clean.

Ready to change cities for the better? Join P4SC and start making a difference!  Share YOUR ideas and join the conversation on the site or on Twitter at #P4SC.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

IBM to develop smart cities in the Delhi-Mumbai industrial corridor

22806700.cmsIBM would support the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Development Corporation Ltd (DMICDC) for development of smart cites in and around the Dighi Port Industrial Area, Maharashtra.

As a business consulting partner, IBM is working with DMICDC to support one of the biggest industrial development projects of the government of India by helping build smarter and sustainable cities.

The Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) is India’s most ambitious infrastructure program aiming to develop new industrial cities as “smart cities” spanning across six states in India.

With the aim of providing digital connectivity among townships DMICDC selected IBM for the company’s expertise in the area of Smarter Cities.

“We are pleased to have IBM as one of the key partners for this project to develop a city based on international standards in close proximity to Dighi Port. This will enhance economic growth, global competitiveness, social inclusion, and environmental sustainability in select cities,” said Amitabh Kant, chief executive officer and managing director, Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC).

Read the complete article on Economictimes.indiatimes.com

- posted by Khalid Raza

Improving Your Commute, 1 (Smarter) City at a Time

by  Naveen Lamba, Associate Partner, Smarter Government, Transportation, and Public Safety, IBM Global Business Services, in The Huffington Post

For many, summer offers a brief respite from the road congestion that burdens drivers and cities around the world. In a few short weeks, those less-crowded highways, trains, and buses will be a distant memory for most commuters.

traffic_morguefileWherever you live, cities are struggling to manage and prepare for short- and long-term traffic congestion. And road congestion and traffic jams aren’t only inconvenient; they can impede economic growth and impact the environment.

Just imagine how much more productive people could be if they could stop being stuck in their cars or other means of transportation for those several hours per day. The good news is that help is on the way. Get the story.

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About the author

Naveen Lamba
Naveen Lamba is IBM’s global industry leader for intelligent transportation systems as well as Associate Partner, Smarter Government, Transportation, and Public Safety, IBM Global Business Services. For nearly two decades, he has been working on intelligent transportation projects around the world for governments and private sector organizations.
Related:
Smarter, More Competitive Cities – Download the whitepaper
- Posted by Regan Kelly

Dublin, Ireland Adopts Smarter Approach on Its Road to Recovery

Ireland’s capital, Dublin, is one of the oldest in Europe. Because its city council wants to maintain the city’s historic fabric, city policy today prevents new roads from being built in some of the most historic areas. But with traffic congestion worsening, the city sought an efficient solution to its traffic woes. To that end, it’s partnered with IBM to collect and analyze data to help tackle its congestion, all part of a push towards making Dublin a Smarter City.

File:Dublin Ireland Night.JPGIreland’s capital: an IBM Smarter City testbed

Today, journey information is released and updated by Dublin city council every minute, enabling residents to go online and find the quickest route to their destination. In addition, research is being conducted in Ireland on similar problems that might be tackled by joining up existing databases. The work is part of IBM’s Smarter Planet initiative, part of which emphasizes applying analytics to solve pressing problems. Read more in The Guardian.

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- Posted by Regan Kelly. Part of our June 2013 theme on the environment and sustainability.

Geraldton, Australia Becoming a Smarter City, with IBM Help

Working with an IBM Smarter Cities Challenge team, the city of Geraldton, Australia is working to build its eminence in technology and clean energy, to attract partners and investors on its path to becoming a global Smarter City.

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Geraldton CEO Tony Brun writes at Citizen IBM about how IBM and Geraldton’s collaboration on how best to use its abundant natural resources. As a member of the global community of Smarter Cities, Geraldton is today well positioned to improve the quality of life for its citizens while advancing its agenda for economic development. Get the story. 

Related:

Ginni Rometty Discusses How to Build a Smarter City:

The Smarter City (interactive)

- Posted by Regan Kelly

IBM Centennial Grant supports movement for green schools in Singapore with SMART meters

singapore greenToday on Citizen IBM, Corporate Citizenship Manager and Singapore Green Building Council member Kok Chin (KC) Tay details how an IBM Centennial Grant is helping to support Singapore’s national movement for green schools. Specifically, a public-private partnership between IBM and Singapore’s Ministry of Education established Project Green Insights to help secondary and post-secondary students understand issues related to energy efficiency and environmental sustainability through education and hands-on projects.  Supported by an IBM Centennial Grant throughout 2012, this pilot program has developed strategies and activities to raise awareness around energy efficiency in 20 academic institutions in Singapore. Participating schools (19 secondary schools and one technical institute, the Institute of Technical Education College East) installed SMART meters to monitor live energy usage, and either created or strengthened their green clubs and developed “green ambassadors” among their student population to develop insights and actions based on the data from the meters projects.

Read more about it here:  http://ibm.co/SXhI4t

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Institute of Technical Education College East, Singapore

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IBM Centennial Grants have helped enable programs to improve access to public information in Latin America, connect India’s rural entrepreneurs to outside markets, provide computer training for Ireland’s older citizens, create better lives for Turkish children with disabilities, and help Vermont (US) residents manage energy better through a program similar to Singapore’s Project Green Insights.

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

IBM Team in Thailand Collaborates for a Smarter City of Chon Buri

Wood carving Chonburi thailand Stock Photo - 13069208A team of IBM executives has begun collaborating with officials of Chon Buri, Thailand to  develop strategies to turn the city into not only the region’s transport hub, but also an international tourist destination.

The team will spend three weeks analyzing needs, making recommendations, and building on existing plans to help Chon Buri realize its vision of becoming a smarter city. The project is part of IBM Smarter Cities Challenge grants to assist progressive, forward-thinking municipalities. Read their story here.

Related: What IS a Smarter City? Watch the video and learn more.

About the Smarter Cities Challenge

IBM Chairman: Indian Cities Must Get Smarter to Tackle Urbanization

Sam Palmisano, IBM Chairman, says leaders will need to gain support for their ideas and concepts, and be persuasive

(from Information Week)

Cities are a critical component of driving the economy. But rapid urbanization around the world is already putting immense pressure on the limited resources available in the world’s cities. And countries like India and China are at the forefront of urbanization — India already has 12 of the world’s 100 largest cities.

Crowded street in Bangalore

Crowded street in Bangalore, India

It took nearly 40 years for the urban population in India to reach 230 million. Studies reveal it will take only half that time to reach the next 250 million. In the next 20 years around 30 Indians will migrate from a rural area to a city every minute. At that growth rate the population of Mumbai will be bigger than that of Canada by 2030. And the Delhi/NCR region will have a GDP bigger than Portugal. With more people choosing to live in cities, India will need 500 new cities in the next 20 years.

At the IBM Smarter Cities forum in New Delhi on September 13, a gathering of city planners, government policy makers, politicians, city architects, technologists, and researchers the consensus was that, even the best technology in the world cannot address the challenges induced by rapid urbanization. Delivering the keynote, IBM’s Chairman, Samuel J. Palmisano said it was really “a leadership issue” and that collaboration was essential. He suggested our leaders “should be systems thinkers, take a long-term view,” and have persuasive skills. And they “shouldn’t confuse leadership with charisma or the sound bite on TV.”

“If (leaders) are going to manage in the long term, they will need to build organizational support for their concepts and ideas. And you can only do that in a collaborative environment, with good team work and spirit. And you can’t dictate it and will it — you have to persuade people (to accept your ideas),” said Palmisano.

He said the problems (due to urbanization) are too severe for our leaders to manage. Yet there were changes happening in cities elsewhere in the world. Palmisano alluded to fresh water systems in Saudi Arabia, waste management systems (recology) in the San Francisco, a public safety crime center in Davao (Philippines), and an end-to-end command center in Rio de Janeiro to monitor all aspects of the city. IBM is also engaged with 3,000 smarter city projects around the world.

“Leaders who are managing these cities are non-ideological. They get things done. They have to solve the problems and make things better. And that’s what you see leaders in urban centers doing. These leaders think in terms of systems. Power generation, water management, transportation, health care and public safety are systems. A city is a system of systems that are interconnected. A great example is Rio de Janeiro. And they take a long-term orientation because you can do this in one election cycle. These are sophisticated projects.”

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