Top 10 Skills To Survive in the 21st Century (Infographic) – No 2 Top Tweet

Image Credit:  eLearning Infographics

Image Credit: eLearning Infographics

Our number two top Tweet for 2013 was this infographic by eLearning Infographics that demonstrates the type of skills needed to survive in the 21st century.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

Why Are There Still So Few Women in STEM?

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Graphic credit: IBM in ‘Helping Women in STEM Thrive’

At the Solvay Conference on Physics in 1927, the only woman in attendance was Marie Curie.  Today, there are still few women who pursue a STEM degree or career (science, technology, engineering, mathematics).  In the US, only one-fifth of physics Ph.D.’s are awarded to women, and only 14 percent of all the physics professors are women.  Globally, only 30 percent of women, on average, participate in STEM fields, both private and public.  A Yale study published last year demonstrated that a young male scientist applying for a STEM job in education is viewed more favorably on average than a woman with the same qualifications and offered a salary nearly $4000 higher. (All facts sourced from 1 and 2 below in ‘Related’ list).

IBM is investing in women, whether new to the company, previous employees or current employees. It is providing support through mentoring and networks that can create a foundation for a career path towards technical leadership roles.  Watch the Technologista YouTube series (below) for an inside glimpse of what women at IBM are doing, and learn more about women at IBM here.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

Women in Technology at IBM – Rejecting the ‘Expected’

technologista2IBM continues the Women Technologista series this week with two blog posts.  In the first one, IBM Senior Vice President and WITI Hall of Famer, Linda Sanford, talks about ‘Nurturing the Next Generation of Technologistas‘.  She talks about how studies have shown that women are naturally more collaborative and better at listening, two tenets for building strong teams and that teams with at least one woman outperform male-only teams.  However, women still hold less than one-fourth of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) jobs, so how do we best tap into and grow this innate talent pool?  Mentorship is vital. Female-executive support groups and increased participation in industry associations, along with formal training and inclusion programs, would also help.  Read more on the Internet Evolution site.

In the second post, Stefanie Chiras, PhD, IBM Manager of System & Technology Group Design Center, shares how she learned to reject the ‘expected’ when she was 10 and her father told her they were going to fix a car transmission.  She said “I can’t do that,” and he replied without a pause, “People do it every day. You can certainly do it once.”  The advice, and the fact that they did fix the transmission, stuck with her.  Half the challenge is overcoming apprehension and preconceived notions.  As for advice from her own career path, she echoes some of the tenets found in the recent IBM Study of Insights from Women Executives, which are:

  • Stay visible
  • Plan your career
  • Integrate work and life

Read the full post, Rejecting ‘The Expected':  One Woman Engineer’s Story on the Huffington Post.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

Into the Blue Galaxy

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Operation Blue Galaxy
Shifts in the market, like mobile and cloud, and new delivery and pricing models, have increased the power of individual practitioners. They know the technology, and influence purchasing decisions like never before.  To reach them, IBM has launched ‘Blue Galaxy’, an exciting cross-IBM initiative to show the universe of software developers, architects, administrators, and other practitioners that IBM is their rocket ship to success.

What is Blue Galaxy?
It’s a project, it’s a community, it’s a movement within and beyond IBM.  The best part of IBM is the people — the technical experts and practitioners across IBM.  The Blue Galaxy mission is enabling and unleashing the knowledge, passion, and enthusiasm of the IBM technical community, across all brands and disciplines, and from across the globe, to reach out and engage the world’s practitioners.  Whether it be via events, content, or social media networks, the goal is simple – develop relationships, learn from our audience, and show our expertise.

It’s not about messaging
It’s about the power of connections, with a small c.  It’s people connecting with people via social media: IBMers, IBM Alumni, IBM Business Partners, clients, prospective clients, and the merely curious. Our goal is to help you to build those connections in social networks, growing your digital eminence, sharing knowledge, and becoming part of the larger conversation that is already occurring.

It’s about you
It’s about sharing your voice, your thoughts, your content, your work, and your ideas with other developers, inside and outside of IBM.  Developers trust the opinions of other developers.  By connecting with developers, you have the ability to shape their opinions and thoughts about IBM products and services.  You are in charge of your digital social presence, and the difference it makes for both your personal goals and the goals of IBM. Growing your digital eminence, sharing your knowledge, expanding your network both inside and outside of IBM…. the actions you take now will have long-lasting positive effects on your career.

iconNoCommunityPhoto155.pngSo, how do you get started with Blue Galaxy?
Here are some ways that all Greater IBMers can get involved:

  1. Create or contribute to a conversation:
    You can write a blog post, create a presentation or a video that showcases your thought leadership and technical expertise — the topics of focus are IBM’s technical leadership in Agile, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Mobile Development, and Security.  Even if you can’t create new material, you can comment on an article, tweet (microblog) about it to promote cool content you like and strengthen existing conversations that are highlighting IBM technical leadership in the market.
  2. Connect and interact
    Connect, share, and collaborate on the developerWorks community where you can contribute to forums, download free product trials and share what you like about them with your networks.  You may also want to check out related communities Jazz.net (Agile Transformation) and Service Management Connect.
  3. Meet and follow Blue Galaxy stars
    Some of our technical experts have been on their social journeys for a while. They are our social role models, folks engaging both internally and externally, with dedicated followings. Some are blogging on official IBM blogs and communities, others are contributing through their individual blogs or in other organizations’ communities.  You can find and follow them on Twitter here.
  4. Try Blue Galaxy featured downloads and give feedback
    Some of product trial downloads have been featured by Blue Galaxy because we are especially interested in feedback on these.  Check them out and leave your feedback in the comments section on that post.
  5. Become a Blue Galaxy star
    There are several ways to become a Blue Galaxy star.  First, if you undertake any of the missions noted above, tell us about them – share a comment below telling us what you did.  Since stars are innovative thought leaders who have distinguished themselves in one or more social channels, you could be selected to be featured as a Blue Galaxy star.  Here are some other opportunities:

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Additional resources:

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–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

Must Read: What Makes a Leader? One Crucial Factor

Most people in the workforce know a story (or two) about a highly intelligent, highly skilled candidate who was promoted into a leadership position only to fail. Many also can tell a story about someone with solid—but not extraordinary—intellectual ability and technical skills who was promoted into a similar position and then soared.

In other words, it can seem like identifying individuals with the right stuff to be leaders is more art than science, says author Daniel Goleman. After all, different leaders’ personal styles vary widely: some are subdued and analytical; while others spend more time promoting their agendas and themselves. Just as importantly, different situations of course call for different types of leadership.

In this classic piece from Harvard Business Review, Mr. Goleman explains that the most effective leaders are all alike, however, in one crucial way. What is it? 

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About the author:

Daniel Goleman is an internationally known psychologist who lectures frequently to professional groups, business audiences, and on college campuses. Emotional Intelligence remained on The New York Times bestseller list for 18 months. The Harvard Business Review called emotional intelligence “a revolutionary, paradigm-shattering idea”. The book was named one of the 25 “Most Influential Business Management Books” by TIME Magazine. In addition, The Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, and Accenture Insititute for Strategic Change have named Goleman among the most influential business thinkers.

Leaders: Here Are The Top 9 Things That Motivate Employees to Succeed

When you wake up in the morning, what fuels you to begin the day? Are you passionate about your work? The triggers that motivate people to achieve are unique for everyone; for some it’s money; for others, it’s wanting to make a difference, writes Glenn Llopis in Forbes.com.

Motivation has been studied for decades, and leaders often use motivational books and other tools to get employees to increase their performance or get them back on track. But if you’re a leader, it’s critical to get to know your employees, and to be specific about how you help each of them achieve their goals, desires and aspirations. To help one another and to accomplish that, you must identify those motivating factors. In this piece from Forbes.com, see the nine things that ultimately motivate employees to achieve.

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Greater IBM, what do you think of these nine motivators? Please share your own story and perspectives by commenting.

 

-Posted by Regan Kelly

Kicking Off 2013 with The Greater IBM Connection

In this week’s issue:

  • It’s all about leadership

  • IBM Connect 2013 – You still have time to sign up

  • What’s new around The Greater IBM Connection

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It’s all about leadership

In the last few weeks, you might have noticed that a lot of our stories, social media posts, tips, and resources have focused on one essential idea: leadership.

After all, the start of a new year is a great time for assessing your life and career and for making new commitments. If one of your goals is to become a better leader, then here are some of the recent posts at The Greater IBM Connection around our central theme, for inspiration.

What are YOUR favorite leadership tips or quotations? Share them with your fellow community members in the Comments.

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IBM Connect 2013 – You still have time to sign up

Get Social. Do Business. IBM Connect 2013 is almost here. This large-scale annual event, January 27 – 31 in Orlando, combines the deep technical content that you’ve loved for 20 years with the learning you need to accelerate your move beyond social media to drive real business value with social and collaborative technologies. And there’s still time to register.

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Why you need to Connect

At IBM Connect 2013, you’ll have opportunities for:

  • 1:1 executive connections
  • Peer to peer connections
  • Exchanging best practices
  • Networking and partnering

What’s in it for me?

You’ll leave IBM Connect with a clear path on how to go beyond social media and embrace social technologies to drive tangible business value and results. You’ll be ready to start using key technologies such as collaboration, portal, Web experiences, content management, analytics, process management, and commerce to go from simply ‘liking’ on social media to truly leading.

How to register:

Register for this event and identify yourself as an IBM alumnus – we’ll let you know about special alumni networking opportunities at and around this event. When registering, you’ll be asked how you heard about the conference. Select “Other”, and then in the open field, be sure to include the code IBMALUM13. That’s all there is to it.

Register now

More:

Don’t miss this new Web lecture, From Liking to Leading(Note: may require a one-time sign-in)

In this brief video, learn more about what social business means to you and your business:

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blogWhat’s new around The Greater IBM Connection

The beginning of the year can be especially busy, with catching up on work missed over the holidays, setting goals for the new year, keeping resolutions. In case you missed these, here’s a roundup of some of the most widely read stories on The Greater IBM Connection blog:

Anything you would like to read more about at The Greater IBM Connection? We always like to hear from you; let us know in the Comments.