IBM’s 5 in 5: In Five Years Everything will Learn

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On December 17th, 2013 IBM (NYSE: IBM) unveiled the eighth annual “IBM 5 in 5″ (#ibm5in5) – a list of innovations that have the potential to change the way people work, live and interact during the next five years. This year’s 5 in 5 are:

Education:  The classroom will learn you (Story Map, Video, Article)
Retail:  Buying local will beat online (Story Map, Video, Article)
Healthcare: Doctors will use your DNA to keep you well (Story Map, Video, Article)
Security: A digital guardian will protect you online (Story Map, Video, Article)
Cities: The city will help you live in it (Story Map, Video, Article)

The IBM 5 in 5 is based on market and societal trends as well as emerging technologies from IBM’s R&D labs around the world that can make these transformations possible.

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–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

IBM NanoMedicine Adventures – Ninjas vs Superbugs (Movie + Infographic)

Ninja Polymer (IBM Research, Flickr)

Ninja Polymer (IBM Research, Flickr)

Antibiotic-resistant ‘superbugs’ like MRSA are one of the biggest health concerns of the 21st century, killing 23,000 Americans a year.  IBM scientists, in partnership with the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, are working on a new type of nanomedicine polymer that can attack these superbugs at the physical level through the use of electrostatic charges.  Traditional antibiotics work by attacking bacteria at the chemical level, which opens the door for the bacteria to evolve and develop resistance.  See the movie poster and learn more.

ninjapolymers

IBM Ninja Polymers Infographic (IBM)

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- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

IBM Fellow Irene Greif Retires – A Pioneer in Building a Workplace that Works

Irene Greif, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business (Photo Credit:  Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

Irene Greif, IBM Fellow and Chief Scientist for Social Business (Photo Credit: Anita Borg Institute for Women in Technology)

IBM Fellow Irene Greif is retiring after more than 25 years with Lotus Development Corporation (where she was head of Research) and IBM. At IBM, she went on to create the Center for Social Business, a global research effort on reinventing the way people work. Along the way, these teams built the foundations of Lotus Sametime and IBM Connections, and revamped email to be the social tool it is today.

Irene began her journey into the workplace of the future while at MIT. Trained as a computer scientist, she was attracted to challenges of communication and collaboration – regardless of underlying technologies. In the 1980s, questions raised by Doug Engelbart’s 1968 Mother of All Demos, such as why some inventions (the mouse) took off, and others (video conferencing and shared screens) were still being reinvented in research labs, led her to study the opportunities – and limits – for office automation solutions. She founded the field of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) in 1984 to help computer scientists and social scientists join forces to understand “how collaborative activities and their coordination can be supported by means of computer systems.”

Irene’s pioneering work changed how technology helps us work, and work together. She reflects on the inspiration to make these tools – and inspiring others to do the same.

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What were the workplace tools like when you started your career?

When I was on the faculty at MIT in the late 1970s and early 80s, office automation was the big thing. But the most interesting technologies being used beyond email were still stuck in research labs. At work, the personal computer – loaded with spreadsheet software, usually Lotus 1-2-3 at the time – was cropping up all over the place, outside IT control. And the question of which word processor to adopt was the next big issue.

Local areas networks were just being installed and slowly replacing “sneakernet” for transferring files. So, there was a lot of opportunity for change. What’s more, since researchers who were inventing new tools for collaboration were looking for realistic test beds outside their labs, it was a great time for a researcher to move into a business setting – that’s where the action was going to be.

How has CSCW evolved since the 1980s?

I started the research field of CSCW before joining IBM, but it fit right into what Lotus (and later IBM) was doing with group support systems. I’ve had the chance to keep reinventing workplace solutions – and recreating CSCW teams – ever since.

In the 1980s, group support systems such as online forms and formal networked processes (to pass information around without printing it or carry floppy disks in our pockets) were still new. Also new were anthropologists studying office life and culture. They found that office work was rarely done according to formal written processes. So, when companies built formal processes into online systems, informal actions, such as just knowing who else was in an approval chain when a manager was on vacation, were ignored.

Working with anthropologists helped us look beyond the technology, and brought social science and computer science together on the team.

How has CSCW impacted design? 

This “observe first” approach led us to reinventing email. We discovered that people hacked together ways to manage their lives around their email. It wasn’t just for messages; they used it for reminders and calendar appointments – well before these functions were built into any email platform.

We set out to design an email system that reflected what people were actually trying to do with it. We used our research to make subtle adjustments, integrating new features into Lotus Notes and providing the rich context that now integrates presence, threading, calendars, and instant messaging.

How else were new ideas by designers and developers meshed with what was being observed?

We also kept an eye on the consumer space to ask “would any of those tools be useful in business communications?” For example, chat apps were popular with kids in the 1990s, and that initially made it a challenge to pitch as a business opportunity. So, we used design through storytelling to prove that it could be useful. Our storyboard showed how customer support could “chat” with experts to help solve a technical issue – while staying on the phone with the customer and providing answers seamlessly. This was the origin of Sametime, the ubiquitous tool that IBMers rely on today.

We’ve been fortunate to work with an extremely open and creative corporate IT department that supports experimentation inside IBM. As a result, we can deploy and observe prototypes inside our really large company. And in some cases, the most important inventions were by the crowd – our users – and not our teams.

We’ve taken a similar approach outside IBM on the internet with projects such as Many Eyes. Launched in 2007, we wanted to know how people would use a visual analytics tool. It’s been active for years and in fact, the users pushed us from numerical to text visualizations that were invented and installed on the site. Many Eyes technology has since been transferred to a product team. Version two was released this year.

What’s next in workplace collaboration technology?

What’s next, in my opinion, is less about technology, and more about design. In fact, at this year’s CSCW conference, the new “Lasting Impact” award will be given to a 1988 paper about why group systems fail. The insight still proves true today: the cost-benefit balance of a tool is often wrong, or not accounted for, in the design phase. If you’re building a new workplace app, some people are likely to benefit more than others. You need to take that into account – either increase benefits to all, or make it particularly appealing for the “helpers” to participate.

Every one of my teams has had computer scientists, social scientists, developers and designers. And we have tried to apply this benefit thought in our designs. The simplest way is to try to assure there is personal value to each participant, even before they realize any benefit from sharing. This approach helped us get buy-in, for example, to add IBM Connections’ shared bookmarks feature. It gets everyone’s bookmarks out of a browser, and into a community of people who will also find them useful.

Since I’m betting on a better design – more user-centered and culturally aware design – as the most important ingredient, I’d like to say just how thrilled I am to see IBM’s renewed focus in design. Their design thinking is close to my heart, based on rich stories and deep understanding of not just how something is used, but why it would be used in the first place.

What has it meant to you to be a “trailblazing” woman in technology?

I sometimes envy the women who came up the technical career ranks after me because they had other women to talk to, and share stories with – something I didn’t have when I was a graduate student. It’s important for me, and others who were “firsts” in their fields, to participate in communities like the Anita Borg Institute. Today, as we see more and more women blazing trails, I remind them to look around and talk to other women while they are in the process.

Regarding mentoring, while having a formal mentor is important, don’t discount your second and third degree connections, who can offer you what I often call meaningful “mentoring moments.” Some of the colleagues I’ve sought out for advice never knew in the moment that their opinions played a role in something that amounted to a critical decision for me.

This kind of interaction is supported in social networking theory: it’s not the people you talk to everyday, but it’s those you reach out to who will have new, and maybe the best, insights.

What are some of your plans after retirement?

The great thing is that I don’t have to have a plan. I never really had a plan for my career, but rather let it evolve and I expect to do the same now. I would like to spend more time on STEM education, mentoring and volunteering, and working with organizations such as the National Academy of Engineering.

And I’ll continue to knit, though maybe now I’ll find time to organize the mess of yarn I’ve collected over the years.

(Video credit: IBM Social Business)

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- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection via Chris Nay, IBM Research Communications

Virtual Job Fair for IBM Research Africa on Dec 5

The African continent accounts for 14 percent of the world’s population and is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. With a growth rate expected to average 7 percent annually over the next 20 years, Africa is poised to become a leading source of innovation in a variety of industries. With this growth comes many challenges spanning traffic congestion to the delivery of fresh water.

If you have what it takes to help solve these grand challenges, the IBM Recruiting team invites professors, scientists and qualified university students to participate in a Research Virtual Recruiting Event for several open positions at our new lab in Nairobi, Kenya.  The event will take place on 5 December and you can participate in several ways.

For details visit:

http://www.research.ibm.com/labs/africa/recruiting/

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- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection via Chris Sciacca, IBM Research Communications

Are You Smarter Than Watson? Try Playing the Trivia Challenge

Photo credit:  LA Times

Photo credit: LA Times

In 2011, IBM’s Watson beat the reigning Jeopardy champions, but maybe you are smarter?  Give it a try with this interactive Trivia challenge from The New York Times where you can play against Watson yourself –> play trivia against Watson

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- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

Get Smarter with IBM Virtual Events in Oct

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Here’s a round-up of some of the cool IBM learning events coming up in October (all times, when listed are in US ET). Check them out!

Event Date Area Link
(Tweetchat) Creating an Intelligent Customer Experience with Author Bernard Marr 10/7/13 at Noon Big Data Customer Experience  on.fb.me/1bzkoR4
(Podcast & LinkedInChat) Listen to/chat with Luba Cherbakov as she shares her story on becoming the 13th woman named as an IBM Fellow. 10/8/13 at 10am Women in Tech, Women in STEM (Podcast) bit.ly/IBMPodcast (LinkedIn Chat) linkd.in/1fP0DHc
(Webcast) Senior IBM systems and technology execs/experts will share why they believe infrastructure matters, as well as tips on Big Data, Cloud, and IT Storage. 10/8/2013 Smarter Computing, Big Data, Cloud ibm.co/1gkuogI
(Webcast) Cloud without Compromise:  Understanding and Capitalizing on Cloud Computing 10/9/2013 at Noon Cloud bit.ly/19a40AZ
(Tweetchat) Smarter Planet: The Social Employee – How Companies can leverage employees as social brand ambassadors (#P4SPChat) 10/10/13 at Noon Social, Smarter Workforce, Brand (Preview) http://ibm.co/1fHQagB (Tweetchat) twubs.com/P4SPchat
(Tweetchat) IBM Cloud:  The New CIO—how cloud is shifting tech leadership with 3 industry panelists 10/10/13 at 4pm Cloud (preview) ibm.co/1bD7jWY (Tweetchat) twubs.com/cloudchat
(Virtual Learning) Basics of Blogging 10/11/13, 10/25/13 at Noon How to blog, Social ibm.co/1bzi0Kb
(Virtual Learning) Twitter for Beginners 10/18/13 at Noon Social, Twitter basics, How to Twitter ibm.co/1bzi0Kb
(Tweetchat) #IBMSWChat Tweetchat: Topic TBD 10/18/13 at 1pm Smarter Workforce #IBMSWChat
(Videocast) IBM Smarter Analytics:  Smarter Government Finance & Budgeting 10/23/13 at Noon Smarter Government bit.ly/1e3KsRU
(Tweetchat) #GreaterIBM and Smarter Planet: Smarter Machines with author Steve Hamm & IBM Research Manager Dr. Dharmendra Modha (#P4SPChat) 10/31/13 at Noon Cognitive Computing wp.me/p2kcos-2uW

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection