IBM NanoMedicine Adventures – Ninjas vs Superbugs (Movie + Infographic)

Ninja Polymer (IBM Research, Flickr)

Ninja Polymer (IBM Research, Flickr)

Antibiotic-resistant ‘superbugs’ like MRSA are one of the biggest health concerns of the 21st century, killing 23,000 Americans a year.  IBM scientists, in partnership with the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, are working on a new type of nanomedicine polymer that can attack these superbugs at the physical level through the use of electrostatic charges.  Traditional antibiotics work by attacking bacteria at the chemical level, which opens the door for the bacteria to evolve and develop resistance.  See the movie poster and learn more.

ninjapolymers

IBM Ninja Polymers Infographic (IBM)

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

IBM Technology To Help Critically Ill Children Around The World

Every year, nearly 7 million children under age 5 die from preventable causes. The medical knowledge to treat these children exists, yet the delivery of effective care is impeded by the global shortage of 4 million medical workers (1.5 million in Africa alone).  While the traditional approach to medical education has brought world-class care to many patients, Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) recognized a need to extend medical knowledge beyond the walls of medical institutions and schools.

OPENPediatrics1Partnering with IBM, BCH has pioneered the world’s first cloud-based social learning platform — OPENPediatrics — which aims to connect physicians and nurses from all resource settings across the world around the sharing of best practices in the care of critically ill children. The platform, which includes IBM’s social networking, cloud, data analytics, video, and simulation technologies, will be made available at no cost to any interested clinicians around the globe.  Today, over 1000 doctors and nurses are testing OPENPediatrics in 74 countries (343 hospitals) around the globe.

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To Learn More:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

Catch Up with The Greater IBM Connection

In this issue:

  • IBM Retirees, Watch your Mailbox for Annual Enrollment Packet Soon
  • The ESC Key – Did You Know an IBMer Made That?
  • Women at IBM in the News
  • Join the Conversation!

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IBM Retirees, Watch Your Mailbox for Annual Enrollment Packet Soon

IBM retirees, the annual enrollment period for 2013 is about to begin. This year, the enrollment period begins October 25 and runs until November 16.

Very soon, you’ll receive your packet in the mail. Take the time to thoroughly review your current plan benefits and costs, including the Retiree Health Access (RHA) plan option.

IBM is committed to providing high-value retiree benefits, and continues to offer a wide variety of plan options tailored to your needs. To read more about the available benefit plan options, learn about the advantages of each, and see why many IBM retirees and their Medicare eligible dependents have enrolled in the RHA program, click here.

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The ESC Key – Did You Know an IBMer Made That?

It undoubtedly helped drive the computer revolution of the 1970s and ‘80s. “It says to the computer: ‘Stop what you’re doing. I need to take control.’ ”

In other words, it reminds the machine that it has a human master. It’s the Escape key, and it was created by an IBMer.

Read more about the invention and the late Mr. Bob Bremer.

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Women at IBM in the News

In case you overlooked the following stories, here are three blog posts that feature one thing in common: the amazing women associated with IBM. Three not to miss:

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Join the conversation! Don’t forget to:

  • Like our Facebook page
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  • Bookmark, visit, and subscribe to this blog
  • Use the hashtags #IBMAlumni and #GreaterIBM in your own Facebook and Twitter posts and get connected!

Boost Focus and Productivity in 10 Minutes – Take a Nap

by David DiSalvo

Few of us enjoy jobs that allow an afternoon siesta, but we’d probably all be better off if they did–including our employers.  According to new research, all we’d really need is a solid 10-minute power nap to boost our focus and productivity.

napping office workerResearchers tested four nap time spans: 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes (and a control group that didn’t nap).  They then tested participants across several benefits for three hours after the nap.  Here’s a summary of the results:

The 5-minute nap produced few benefits in comparison with the no-nap control. The 10-minute nap produced immediate improvements in all outcome measures (including sleep latency, subjective sleepiness, fatigue, vigor, and cognitive performance), with some of these benefits maintained for as long as 155 minutes. The 20-minute nap was associated with improvements emerging 35 minutes after napping and lasting up to 125 minutes after napping. The 30-minute nap produced a period of impaired alertness and performance immediately after napping, indicative of sleep inertia, followed by improvements lasting up to 155 minutes after the nap.

The problem is that naps are awfully hard to cut down to 10 minutes; once you get a little taste, it’s tempting to just keep sleeping.  But as this and other studies indicate, longer naps are not the best naps.  Snooze for just 30 minutes and you fall into sleep inertia,  the feeling of grogginess and disorientation that comes with awakening from a deep sleep.

Another thing to remember about naps is that timing is everything.  If you nap too late in the day, you’ll interfere with your body’s circadian rhythm and will probably sleep poorly at night.  Best times to nap are mid to late morning or early afternoon.

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Do you ever nap during the workday? Let us know!