IBM’s 5 in 5: In Five Years Everything will Learn

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On December 17th, 2013 IBM (NYSE: IBM) unveiled the eighth annual “IBM 5 in 5″ (#ibm5in5) – a list of innovations that have the potential to change the way people work, live and interact during the next five years. This year’s 5 in 5 are:

Education:  The classroom will learn you (Story Map, Video, Article)
Retail:  Buying local will beat online (Story Map, Video, Article)
Healthcare: Doctors will use your DNA to keep you well (Story Map, Video, Article)
Security: A digital guardian will protect you online (Story Map, Video, Article)
Cities: The city will help you live in it (Story Map, Video, Article)

The IBM 5 in 5 is based on market and societal trends as well as emerging technologies from IBM’s R&D labs around the world that can make these transformations possible.

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Related:

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

#GreaterIBM Tweet Chat Preview: Smarter Machines #P4SPChat on 10/31/13

brain in boxHow smart can machines get?  Can they think like humans?  What’s the science behind it and what are the implications?

Chat Recap Here

Join the conversation as The Greater IBM Connection (#GreaterIBM) and People for a Smarter Planet (#P4SPChat) host a Tweet Chat on the topic of Cognitive Computing on Thursday October 31, 2013 from 12pm-1pm ET.

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Panelists

Our panelists for the Tweet Chat will be Steve Hamm and Dr. Dharmendra Modha.

Steve Hamm, IBM Communications Strategist and Co-Author of Smart Machines: IBM's Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

Steve Hamm, Co-Author of Smart Machines

Steve Hamm, IBM Communications Strategist, has co-authored a new book, Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Systems with IBM Research Director John E. Kelly III.  It’s the second book that Steve has co-authored at IBM; the first was IBM’s Centennial book, called Making the World Work Better.  Prior to joining IBM in 2009, Steve worked in journalism for 30 years, as a technology writer and editor at San Jose Mercury News, PC Week, and BusinessWeek. He also wrote two additional books, Bangalore Tiger (2006), on the rise of the Indian tech industry, and The Race for Perfect (2008), on innovation in mobile computing.  Learn more about Steve.

Dharmendra Mohda, IBM Research Senior Manager, Cognitive Computing.  Photo Credit:  Tony Avelar/Bloomberg

Dharmendra Mohda, IBM Research Senior Manager, Cognitive Computing. Photo Credit: Tony Avelar/Bloomberg

Dr. Dharmendra Modha is the founder of IBM’s Cognitive Computing group at IBM Research – Almaden and the principal investigator for DARPA SyNAPSE team globally. In this role, Dr. Modha leads a global team across neuroscience, nanoscience and supercomputing to build a computing system that emulate the brain’s abilities for perception, action, and cognition – all while consuming many orders of magnitudes less power and space than today’s computers.  Learn more about Dr. Dharmendra Modha.

So, please join the #GreaterIBM and People for a Smarter Planet (#P4SPChat) Tweet Chat on 10/31/13 from 12pm – 1pm ET as we discuss “Where Will Smarter Machines Take Us?”.  You can join at twubs.com/P4SPchat

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WHERE WILL SMART MACHINES TAKE US questions:

  • Q1: What’s new and different about cognitive computers?
  • Q2: What are some of the major applications and benefits of cognitive computing?
  • Q3: Can computing systems emulate a living brain’s computing efficiency & power usage?
  • Q4: Can computing systems emulate a living brain’s intuition and creativity?
  • Q5: How will cognitive computers and humans collaborate together?

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#GreaterIBM Tweet Chat with IBM People for a Smarter Planet (#P4SPChat)

Date: Thursday, October 31, 2013
Time: 12pm – 1pm US ET
Join the Tweet Chat: twubs.com/P4SPchat
Hashtags to follow & engage in the conversation in real-time: #GreaterIBM, #P4SPChat

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About #GreaterIBM

The Greater IBM Connection is IBM’s global business and professional network that brings together current and former IBMers around the world.  As the evolving technology industry increasingly calls for relationship led sales, marketing, branding, and recruiting, The Greater IBM Connection provides a tremendous opportunity to stay connected and engaged with market influencers.  We hope you join and contribute today!

About #P4SPChat

Are you interested in talking about building a Smarter Planet? Join us and discuss how businesses, governments and entire industries are adopting technologies to become efficient and effective. Follow the hashtag #P4SPchat.  Tweet Chats are held on an adhoc basis, as scheduled.

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Additional Resources:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

Dr. Dharmendra Modha – Building IBM’s Brain in a Box

Photo Credit:  Qnexis

Photo Credit: Qnexis

““We are fundamentally expanding the boundary of what computers can do.  This could have far reaching impacts on technology, business, government and society.”

IBM’s Watson may have beaten the reigning Jeopardy champions in 2011, but IBM scientists, led by Dr. Dharmendra Modha, are now working on developing new, smart computers designed from the human brain.  The ultimate goal is to build a chip ecosystem with ten billion neurons and a hundred trillion synapses, while consuming just a kilowatt of power and occupying less than a two-liter soda bottle.

Dharmendra Mohda, IBM Research Senior Manager, Cognitive Computing.  Photo Credit:  Tony Avelar/Bloomberg

Dharmendra Modha, IBM Research Senior Manager, Cognitive Computing. Photo Credit: Tony Avelar/Bloomberg

Dr. Dharmendra Modha is the founder of IBM’s Cognitive Computing group at IBM Research – Almaden and the principal investigator for DARPA SyNAPSE team globally. In this role, Dr. Modha leads a global team across neuroscience, nanoscience and supercomputing to build a computing system that emulate the brain’s abilities for perception, action, and cognition – all while consuming many orders of magnitudes less power and space than today’s computers.

Stay tuned for details on a Tweet chat we’ll be hosting with Dharmendra Modha and Steve Hamm on Thursday, October 31.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

Where Will Smart Computers Take Us? Sneak Preview of IBMers’ New Book

smartmachinesbookcoverWhat is the real science happening today behind  artificial intelligence? IBM Communications Strategist and former business and tech journalist Steve Hamm has co-authored a new book on the topic, titled Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Systems.

Co-authored by IBM Research Director John E. Kelly III, the book will be published by Columbia University Press on October 15. It lays out IBM’s vision of the next era of computing, the cognitive era, which we believe will be as different from today’s computing as this period was from the tabulating era.

The book describes what’s happening in cognitive computing, how it’s happening, and what impacts it will have on the economy, business, individuals, and society. It’s a call to action for technologists, scientists, universities, government leaders, tech industry companies, and students to get involved and help to usher in the new era.

Download a free chapter of the book from Columbia University Press

Pre-order the book from Amazon.com

Order directly from Columbia University Press to get a 30% discount – use the discount coupon code SMART.

Read the free chapter and be sure to share it with your social networks!

To learn more about author Steve Hamm, read his interview with The Greater IBM Connection.

In addition, stay tuned for details on a Tweet chat we’ll be hosting with Steve and Dharmendra Modha on Thursday, October 31.

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Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto and Regan Kelly

Interview with Steve Hamm, Co-Author of Book on Cognitive Computing

Steve Hamm, IBM Communications Strategist and Co-Author of Smart Machines: IBM's Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

Steve Hamm, IBM Communications Strategist and Co-Author of Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

“I want to make the world work better and more sustainably, and IBM can help get that done.”

IBM Communications Strategist Steve Hamm has co-authored with IBM Research Director John E. Kelly III a new book, Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Systems.

The book will be published by Columbia University Press on October 15. It lays out IBM’s vision of the next era of computing, the cognitive era.

It’s the second book that Steve has co-authored at IBM; the first was IBM’s Centennial book, called Making the World Work Better.

Prior to joining IBM in 2009, Steve worked in journalism for 30 years, as a technology writer and editor at San Jose Mercury News, PC Week, and BusinessWeek. He also wrote two additional books, Bangalore Tiger (2006), on the rise of the Indian tech industry, and The Race for Perfect (2008), on innovation in mobile computing.

Sneak preview of Smart Machines

Stay tuned for details on a Tweet chat we’ll be hosting with Steve and Dharmendra Modha on Thursday, October 31.

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The Greater IBM Connection: What do you do at IBM?

Steve Hamm: I help shape our marketing and communications strategy, which combines paid (advertising), earned (PR) and owned (content we create ourselves). I focus on the “owned” part. I produce mini-documentary videos and write everything from Tweets to books–including co-authoring IBM’s centennial book, Making the World Work Better, and co-authoring the new book, Smart Machines.

At the highest level, my role at IBM is to help corporate communications make the transition from traditional public relations — communicating through the media — to the new model of communicating directly with our many constituents and influencing people through social media. In addition, I aspire to be IBM’s chief storyteller.

When did you join IBM?

I joined in December of 2009.

Tell us about your career prior to that – how did you come to do what you’re doing now?

I was a journalist for 30 years, starting at small newspapers in Connecticut in the 1980s. I was later the technology editor for the San Jose Mercury News, a writer and editor at PC Week, and a writer and editor at BusinessWeek (12 years there).

I covered the technology industry for 20 years. It seems like I have lived through at least half a dozen tech revolutions.

I wrote two books prior to my time at IBM. Bangalore Tiger (2006) was about the rise of the Indian tech industry. The Race for Perfect (2008) was about innovation in mobile computing.

Previous to my stint in journalism, I owned a small book store in Danbury, Connecticut, and worked in book stores in Manhattan.

I also wrote 1 1/2 novels. Neither the 1 nor the 1/2 was published.

I grew up in a small former coal mining town in Western Pennsylvania and got my education at Carnegie Mellon University.

What was it that interested you about putting your skills/talents into work at IBM?

In my last few years at BusinessWeek, I covered IBM. My main focuses were on innovation and globalization.

When BusinessWeek lost much of its advertising support and McGraw-Hill began shopping it around, I started looking for my next career move. I was attracted to IBM for two reasons: its incredible capabilities as an innovation engine and the Smarter Planet agenda. I want to make the world work better and more sustainably, and IBM can help get that done.

What inspired you to write this book? What was the impetus for creating it, now?

In preparation for IBM’s centennial celebration, John Kelly asked a group at IBM Research to look 100 years into the past to help tell the story of how far IBM had come in its first 100 years. He also asked the group to look 100 years into the future. Where was computing going? That project stimulated a lot of discussions around IBM Research and elsewhere in the company about the future of computing. During the centennial year and thereafter, John gave a series of presentations about the major technology shifts he saw coming.  He said we’re in the midst of a transition from the era of traditional computing, which started in the 1940s, to a new era of computing–which we later began calling the cognitive computing era.

This was the first time since the 1960s that IBM had a comprehensive vision of the future of computing. I told John and some of my communications colleagues that we should write a short book about it. At first, we were planning on doing just an ebook, but after we hooked up with Columbia University Press, the publisher of the business book imprint urged us to make a print version, as well.

Download a free chapter of the book smartmachinesbookcover

Tell us about the collaborative process you, John Kelly, and others used to develop the book.

I began by interviewing John to get the full picture of the vision he was in the process of developing. He suggested a list of people at IBM he thought I should interview. I talked to those people and many more–both inside the company and outside. We decided to go deep on several key technology areas: learning systems, big data analytics, data-centric computing systems and nanotechnology.

I also wanted to look at how cognitive technologies would affect cities in the future. So we organized the book around those topics. I sent sections of the book to John as I completed them, got his feedback, and reworked the chapters.

We also got a lot of help from the editors at Columbia University Press and a handful of university professors who read the draft and sent comments.

What do you see as the book’s particular relevance/importance to IBMers and Greater IBMers? 

To my mind, the era of cognitive systems presents an opportunity for IBM to make big bets on key technologies and to, potentially, become the unrivaled leader in the new era of computing. I think it will take a lot of bravery on the part of IBM’s senior leadership team to be as bold as they will need to be. They’re under incredible pressure from Wall Street to meet short-term financial goals. If IBM goes big on this one, many current employees will have an opportunity to participate in one of the major technology revolutions. Current and former employees who are IBM stockholders could reap big gains if IBM bets big and wins.

When you write that you believe that the cognitive era will be “as different from today’s computing as this period was from the tabulating era”, can you elaborate? What do you suspect will be the most significant difference(s) in people’s day-to-day lives, once cognitive computing has been fully implemented?

Tabulating machines were good at arithmetic and at organizing numbers in rows and columns. Today’s computers are very good at math, organizing and storing routine information, desktop publishing, and presenting Web pages and videos. Cognitive computers will be able to sense, learn, reason, predict and interact with humans in powerful new ways. They’ll help people penetrate complexity, make the most of big data, and make better decisions. They’ll help people live and work better.

Given its enormous impact, what are some ways people can actively prepare for, and get involved in, this new era?

Students and young professionals can study the technology disciplines that feed into cognitive computing, including artificial intelligence, information management, data analytics, systems engineering and nanotechnology. Midi-career professionals can shift into cognitive-related jobs. Individuals can look forward to having information and insights and intelligent agents at their beck and call anywhere and any time.

What is your response to people who fear certain aspects of cognitive computing, or hold inaccurate ideas about how it works and will work?

Some people are afraid that computers will take control, like “Hal” in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey; or that computers will eliminate people’s jobs. It’s true that computer automation has eliminated or transformed many jobs over the past 70 years, but that’s true of all technologies. Cognitive technologies will change people’s jobs, as well, though I think they’ll be primarily augmentative rather than replacing human effort. It’s incumbent on individuals and society to find new skills and opportunities for humans, so people can work in collaboration with computers to do things that neither people nor machines can do well now. At the same time, it’s up to society to prevent machines from asserting too much control over organizations and people’s lives.

What is next for you personally? What does the future hold?

I’m learning about how cognitive computing will change organizations, work and leadership. When I know, I’ll write about it.

What do you do for fun,  in the rest of your non-IBM life? How do you like to spend your free time?

I exercise 1 1/4 hours every morning during the week, which keeps me healthy and happy. On the weekends, I ride my bike, do home maintenance and hang out with my wife, son and friends. My wife, son and I have been binge-watching Orange is the New Black on Netflix.

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Related:

- Posted by Regan Kelly and Julie Yamamoto

IBM Brain In The Machine: A “Cognitive Milestone”

Neurosynaptic Cores This network of neurosynaptic cores is derived from wiring in the monkey brain.

Neurosynaptic Cores This network of neurosynaptic cores is derived from wiring in the monkey brain.

IBM Research Almaden unveiled has the world’s grandest simulation of a brain, running on 96 supercomputers at Supercomputing 2012.  That’s half a trillion neurons and a hundred trillion synapses.

The initial goal of the project, code-named Compass, is far more ambitious than anything previously attempted, and actually features almost 10x as many neurons as there are in a human brain. Science News Daily called it a “cognitive milestone,” and Popular Science writes that IBM’s “cognitive computing program… just hit a major high.”

To do it, IBM used its cognitive computing chips unveiled last year.  They are designed to recreate the phenomena between spiking neurons and synapses. More than 2 billion of these cores were divided into 77 brain-inspired regions, with gray matter and white matter connectivity, according to IBM.

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For More Information:

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

 

IBM’s 5 in 5: Welcome To The Era of Cognitive Systems

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On December 17th, 2012 IBM (NYSE: IBM) unveiled the seventh annual “IBM 5 in 5″ (#ibm5in5) – a list of innovations that have the potential to change the way people work, live and interact during the next five years. This year’s 5 in 5 are:

Touch: You will be able to touch through your phone (Story Map, Video, Blog Post)
Sight: A pixel will be worth a thousands words (Story Map, Video, Blog Post)
Hearing: Computers will hear what matters (Story Map, Video, Blog Post)
Taste: Digital taste buds will help you to eat smarter (Story Map, Video, Blog Post)
Smell: Computers will have a sense of smell (Story Map, Video, Blog Post)

The IBM 5 in 5 is based on market and societal trends as well as emerging technologies from IBM’s R&D labs around the world that can make these transformations possible.

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Related:

–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection