Since 2000, Our Collective Attention Span Has Decreasd by 40% – Is it Facebook’s Fault?

(from Mashable.com) Internet addictions — especially to social media — have been well documented. But what’s the psychology behind it?

As it turns out, receiving and answering a notification results in a hit of dopamine, a chemical neurotransmitter associated with the motivation and reward response in the human brain. Social media notifications can have the same addictive effect.

Is this addiction real, though? In China, Taiwan and South Korea “Internet Addiction Disorder” is already accepted as a psychological diagnosis. Next year it’s slated for inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-V).

Facebook and Internet addiction can have damaging effects, such as a decrease in our attention span — in fact, since 2000, our collective attention span has decreased by 40%. Check out this infographic to learn what’s actually happening.

Facebook addiction

Got a Tough Crowd? Presenting to Senior Executives

Time is short – are you ready?

In this article, by Nancy Duarte in the Harvard Business Review, learn how to quickly win over one of the toughest, most pressed-for-time audiences you’ll EVER face as a presenter: senior executives and other decision-makers. Click here to read.

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Nancy DuarteNancy Duarte is the author of the all-new edition of the HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations, as well as two award-winning books on the art of presenting, Slide:ology and Resonate. Follow Duarte on Twitter: @nancyduarte.