IBM Brain In The Machine: A “Cognitive Milestone”

Neurosynaptic Cores This network of neurosynaptic cores is derived from wiring in the monkey brain.

Neurosynaptic Cores This network of neurosynaptic cores is derived from wiring in the monkey brain.

IBM Research Almaden unveiled has the world’s grandest simulation of a brain, running on 96 supercomputers at Supercomputing 2012.  That’s half a trillion neurons and a hundred trillion synapses.

The initial goal of the project, code-named Compass, is far more ambitious than anything previously attempted, and actually features almost 10x as many neurons as there are in a human brain. Science News Daily called it a “cognitive milestone,” and Popular Science writes that IBM’s “cognitive computing program… just hit a major high.”

To do it, IBM used its cognitive computing chips unveiled last year.  They are designed to recreate the phenomena between spiking neurons and synapses. More than 2 billion of these cores were divided into 77 brain-inspired regions, with gray matter and white matter connectivity, according to IBM.

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–Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

 

World’s First Smartphone = Apple or Android? Think again….

IPhone and IBM Simon

IPhone and IBM Simon

Twenty years ago, a small team of IBM engineers from the IBM PC company’s advanced technology group in Boca Raton was assembled to create a new mobile device that combined a computer with a cell phone. It was called a personal communicator – we know it today as a smart phone. The team was given a very short deadline – less than four months. A true skunkworks project, they were freed from IBM’s normal product development processes. Even so, they were hard-pressed to meet the deadline, working 80 hours weeks. Somehow they made it, and the prototype debuted at Comdex that fall. The operational prototype, innovatively called the IBM Personal Communicator, was large and heavy – a first iteration of a new technology that embodied many technical compromises. But it worked, and was the hit of the show. Industry representatives lined up three deep to see it, and it made the front page of the next morning’s USA Today Money Section. The enthusiastic reception convinced IBM to turn the device into a product, which was marketed by Bell South in 1993 as the IBM Simon – the world’s first smart phone.

http://youtu.be/GUG7nwMmoUc

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The December 2012 theme for The Greater IBM Connection is ‘corporate history’, and Paul Lasewicz, IBM Corporate Archivist, will be sharing with us some of the highlights from IBM’s history.

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Paul Lasewicz, IBM Corporate Archivist

Paul Lasewicz, IBM Corporate Archivist

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