Data Intelligence – Evolution of Computing Creativity from the 1950s

From the Information Machine video

From the Information Machine video

“As a function of design, the calculator provides creative man a higher platform upon which to stand and from which to work,”  – video narrator.

In honor of #ThrowbackThursday, here’s a fascinating peek back into the 1950s.  Charles and Ray Eames wrote and produced this commercial for IBM, called ‘The Information Machine: Man and the Data Processor’, which debuted at the 1958 Brussels’ World’s Fair.  It draws the viewer through the evolution of early problem-solving and design theory using a scratchy cartoon animation.  A primitive man, the first ‘artist’, walks the earth observing natural forms and storing their visual properties in a ‘memory bank’ which supplies the data for entire systems of logic.  From there, a somewhat comical leap from the first sail boat to the preeminence of the computer as a tool for creative man.

———————————————————————————

To Learn More:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

IBM Watson to be in NYC Play Nov 15 – Dec 29 2013

The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence (Image Credit:  Playwright Horizons)

The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence (Image Credit: Playwright Horizons)

Playwrights Horizons, the biggest theater dedicated to American plays in New York City, has independently developed a play called “The (Curious Case of the) Watson Intelligence“.  It looks at the relationship between the expert and the assistant loosely weaving together narratives from the Watsons of Alexander Graham Bell, Sherlock Holmes and the IBM Jeopardy! Challenge. It is potentially helpful to IBM as it frames the expert / assistant relationship as central to progress, and places Watson in that collaborative context (often humorously).

———————————————————————————

Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

Work Burnout in A Virtual Team? Here’s How to Avoid It

(Image Credit:  B2C)

(Image Credit: B2C)

The workplace of today is ‘always connected’ and yet, strangely, often disconnected with the prevalence of technology and global virtual teams. With mobile devices keeping us plugged in anytime, anywhere, it’s easy to keep on working, and working, and working, until you lose all sense of balance and separation between work and personal life. The to-do lists and inbox never seems to get any shorter, and you may never get to know your team in person. Enter the age of Burnout Culture in the Virtual World. Where you are always just one click away from your never-ending projects, but you’re working on them in isolation. Here’s some quick tips on how to avoid work burnout in a virtual team:

(Image Credit:  Mother Nature Network)

(Image Credit: Mother Nature Network)

———————————————————————————

Related:

- By Julie Yamamoto

#GreaterIBM Big Data Tweet Chat Preview: Is Data Science Your Next Career? on 12/4/13

BigDataCubeThinking about a career as a data scientist?  You may soon become one of the most sought-after people in the  industry.  Think about this – the data scientist career is projected to grow by 18.7 percent by 2020, and Big Data is expected to be a 53.4 billion industry by 2016 (Source, VentureBeat).

So what is a data scientist exactly and what kind of skills are needed to succeed in this career?

Chat Recap Here

Join the conversation as The Greater IBM Connection (#GreaterIBM) hosts a Tweet Chat on the topic of Data Science careers on Wednesday, December 4, 2013 from 12pm-1pm ET.  (Alternate link to join if Twubs is down = http://tweetchat.com/room/GreaterIBM)

————————

Panelists

Our panelists for the Tweet Chat will be Jim Kobielus and Tom Deutsch

Jim Kobielus, IBM Photo Credit:  Data Informed

Jim Kobielus, IBM Senior Program Director, Product Marketing, Big Data Analytics (Photo Credit: Data Informed)

James Kobielus (@jameskobielus) is an industry veteran and serves as IBM’s big data evangelist. He spearheads IBM’s thought leadership activities in Big Data, Hadoop, enterprise data warehousing, advanced analytics, business intelligence, data management, and next best action technologies. He works with IBM’s product management and marketing teams in Big Data. He has spoken at such leading industry events as Hadoop Summit, Strata, and Forrester Business Process Forum. He has published several business technology books and is a very popular provider of original commentary on blogs and many social media.  Prior to joining IBM in 2012, Jim worked as a Senior Analyst on Big Data at Forrester Research and an editor at Network World.  To learn more about Jim, see the links below:

Tom Deutsch, IBM Program Director - Big Data and Advanced Analytics

Tom Deutsch, IBM Program Director – Big Data and Advanced Analytics

Tom Deutsch (@thomasdeutsch), IBM Program Director in Big Data & Analytics, has more than 20 years in the industry.  As a veteran of two startups, Deutsch is an expert on the technical, strategic and business information management issues facing the Enterprise today.  Most of Tom’s work has been on emerging technologies and business challenges, and he brings a strong focus on the cross-functional work required to have early stage project succeed.  He played a formative role in the transition of Hadoop-based technology from IBM Research to IBM Software Group, and he continues to be involved with IBM Research Big Data activities and transition from Research to commercial products. Tom created the IBM BigInsights Hadoop based product, and then has spent several years helping customers with Apache Hadoop, BigInsights and Streams technologies identifying architecture fit, developing business strategies and managing early stage projects across more than 200 customer engagements. Tom has co-authored a Big Data book (Harness the Power of Big Data) and multiple thought papers.  To learn more about Tom, see the links below:

So, please join the #GreaterIBM Tweet Chat on 12/4/13 from 12pm – 1pm ET as we discuss “Is Data Science Your Next Career?”. You can join at twubs.com/GreaterIBM

————————

IS DATA SCIENCE YOUR NEXT CAREER questions:

  • Q1: Why is the data science field growing so much?
  • Q2: How would you define ‘data scientist’ as a profession?
  • Q3: What are the hottest specialties for data scientists?
  • Q4: What type of skills, education, and aptitude are needed to become a data scientist?
  • Q5: What are the chief pitfalls to avoid in building a career as a data scientist?

————————

#GreaterIBM Tweet Chat

Date: Wednesday, December 4, 2013
Time: 12pm – 1pm US ET
Join the Tweet Chat: twubs.com/GreaterIBM
Hashtags to follow & engage in the conversation in real-time: #GreaterIBM

————————

About #GreaterIBM

The Greater IBM Connection is IBM’s global business and professional network that brings together current and former IBMers around the world. As the evolving technology industry increasingly calls for relationship led sales, marketing, branding, and recruiting, The Greater IBM Connection provides a tremendous opportunity to stay connected and engaged with market influencers. We hope you join and contribute today!

Related Big Data Tweet Chats

You can continue to follow Big Data discussions via the following Tweet Chats:

IBM Blu Every other Wed 1-2pm Big Data #ibmblu
CXO Mon 12-1pm Big Data Customer Experience Optimization #CXO

———————————————————————————

Additional Resources:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager The Greater IBM Connection

3 Ways to Beat the Monday Morning Blues

Image Credit:  Sudarshan Srinivasan, Chakraascope

Image Credit: Sudarshan Srinivasan, Chakraascope

blue Monday (noun) – a Monday regarded as a depressing workday in contrast to the pleasant relaxation of the weekend (dictionary.com)

Do you ever experience the Monday morning blues? While the prevailing definition seems to be about the contrast of the first workday of the week (Monday) versus the relaxation experienced over the weekend, the Monday morning blues can also be about other things as well, such as facing a long ‘to-do’ list for the week and feeling overwhelmed or simply feeling tired. Here are 3 ways you can beat the Monday morning blues and ensure that you have a good jump-start on your work week:

1 – Get a good night’s rest on the weekends too

It’s easy to get off-kilter over the weekend just because you can. Stay up late watching movies and then sleeping in late or taking naps in the afternoon over the weekend is a sure-fire way to get out of sync for the workweek. Sticking to the same schedule, regardless of the day of the week, will help you feel more rested and energized throughout the week. Plus, the bonus is, if you get up early on the weekends too, you’ll have more weekend time to get things done or enjoy your time!

2 – Spend ‘quiet time’ every morning

Before you jump right into work and your long ‘to-do’ list, why not spend a few minutes of quiet time first? Grab a cup of coffee and sit out on your front porch, or wherever your best ‘quiet time’ place is. Before you read the newspaper, before you go to the gym, before you do anything really. Just a few minutes of quiet time to center yourself and collect your thoughts before you start the day. Call it ‘quiet time’ discipline, and use it however you like – to meditate, journal, or simply listen to the birds greet the morning. In our fast-paced lives, where 80% of the world’s data was created in the last two years, and people are acquiring cellphones at a pace 5 times faster than the growth of the human race, when do we take the time to stop and smell the roses? It’s important.

3 – Prioritize your ‘to-do’ list

One thing about Monday mornings is that you are facing a whole week’s worth of a ‘to-do’ list, or things that you really feel like you need to accomplish. Even if you haven’t written it down, you generally have an idea of what you think you need to accomplish this week, and it can be overwhelming.  Also, since your list might be really long, your Monday Morning Blues may also be taking into account that you won’t really have any breaks that week as you try to slug your way through that long list.  So take a few minutes to prioritize that list and lay out the most important goals you need to accomplish for the week.  That way, you will not only feel energized by the direction you’ve layed out for the week, but you will also feel great as you check off each item on the list.  Plus, as a bonus, since you are clear about accomplishing your major goals for the week, you will feel much better about taking small breaks throughout the week also, which will help to re-energize your thinking and creativity as well.

———————————————————————————

Related:

- By Julie Yamamoto

IBM and Space Flight: What’s Next for Billions of Earth-Like Planets in the Galaxy?

Missions of the future?  (Photo Credit:  IBM 100)

Missions of the future?  (Photo Credit: IBM 100)

A new analysis of data from NASA’s Kepler spacecraft by Erik Petigura has revealed that there could be billions of habitable Earth-size planets in the galaxy.  According to Mr. Petigura’s paper, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, one out of every five sunlike stars in the galaxy has a planet roughly the size of Earth flying in orbits around those suns – at distances that make temperatures on the planet neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water to exist.

The Space Shuttle Columbia’s launch on April 12, 1981, with five IBM computers, marked humanity’s first reusable spacecraft and the beginning the US Space Shuttle Program.  (Photo Credit:  IBM 100)

The Space Shuttle Columbia’s launch on April 12, 1981, with five IBM computers, marked humanity’s first reusable spacecraft and the beginning the US Space Shuttle Program. (Photo Credit: IBM 100)

So what’s next in space exploration?  Some scientists speculate that a permanent residence on the Moon would be the next logical step. Others predict a human mission to Mars will be feasible by the mid-21st century. Whatever the task at hand, technology companies like IBM and others will be there to lend their technological know-how and scientific expertise to help explore the boundaries of what’s possible.

For many millions of people around the world, the most dramatic moment in the history of space flight was the first lunar landing 35 years ago. Of course, the journey to the Moon began long before Neil Armstrong stepped out of the Eagle onto the Sea of Tranquility, and it was built on a series of accumulating achievements over many years. IBM was involved both at the beginning of that journey and throughout. And in the three decades following the July 1969 Apollo 11 mission, IBM continued to play an important role in mankind’s exploration of the high frontier and in the increasing use of space for science, communications and business.

Did you know that IBM’s involvement with the US space program began even before NASA existed?  In fact, IBM developed computers for NASA’s predecessor, the US National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. IBM was involved in the Apollo program from the beginning. And in the three decades following the July 1969 Apollo 11 mission, IBM continued to play an important role in humankind’s exploration of the high frontier—helping advance science, communications and business.  Learn more

(Video description):  A global collaboration of 19 countries, the SKA will be the largest and most sensitive radio telescope ever built. The SKA will revolutionize humankind’s understanding of the cosmos by answering questions about the origin and evolution of the universe, as well as other mysteries of time and space. It will consist of thousands of receptors stretched across an area the size of a continent—the total collecting area of these receptors combined will be approximately one square kilometer. IBM is working to map and model the complex ecosystem of capabilities that will be required to build the SKA.

———————————————————————————

Related:

- Posted by Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection

IBM Computer Creativity: 3 Things You Never Knew – Movies, Cooking, Books

Image Credit:  Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

Image Credit: Lord of the Rings movie trilogy

This is Part 2 of the IBM Creativity Series – Part 1 covered 3 Things You Never Knew About IBM Creativity – Games, Art, and Music. This post will cover 3 things you never knew about IBM computer creativity.

In addition to IBM driving innovation and creativity for 102 years, as IBM CEO Ginni Rometty recently shared, IBM computers have also long been used to help spur the creative process.  Here are few of the more notable examples of how IBM computers and technology played a critical part in the creative process.

Category 1 (Movies):  

Lord of The Rings Trilogy:  IBM supplied digital effects facility Weta Digital, Ltd., with 150 IBM® IntelliStation® workstations, running Linux®, for the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy. Weta created effects, from digital horses to Gollum, a character in the series.  Weta and its sister company, Weta Workshop, won two Oscars for their digital effects work on the first “Lord of The Rings” trilogy.  To learn more:

Image Credit:  IMDb

Image Credit: IMDb

Despicable Me:  IBM provided an iDataPlex system to Illumination Entertainment to help it meet the massive production requirements involved in creating the computer-animated 3-D feature film, “Despicable Me”, released in 2010.  The animation process to produce the film generated 142 terabytes of data — an amount roughly equivalent to the traffic generated by over 118 million active MySpace users or 250,000 streams of 25 million songs.  The iDataPlex solution also included a water-cooled door that allows the system to run with no air conditioning required, saving up to 40% of the power used in typical server configurations for this type of production process.  To learn more:

Image Credit:  Fast Company (Italian grilled lobster, with a complex set of pairings including salt, pepper, saffron, green olives, tomato, pumpkin, mint, oregano, white wine, water, macaroni, orange juice, orange, bacon, and oil. )

Image Credit: Fast Company (Italian grilled lobster, with a complex set of pairings including salt, pepper, saffron, green olives, tomato, pumpkin, mint, oregano, white wine, water, macaroni, orange juice, orange, bacon, and oil. )

Category 2 (Cooking):  When you think of the creative things that humans do, cooking comes to mind as one creative outlet that appeals to many.  After winning at chess and Jeopardy, taking on large databases of information to cook up something creative for dinner seems like a logical step.  After all, while most chefs may only consider pairings of hundreds of different ingredients for the evening meal, there are probably unlimited possibilities of pairings that might taste good.  So, the IBM flavorbot is looking to put together underrated highly flavorful ingredients, unusual but tasty flavor pairings, and bring them all together into whole recipes.  To generate leads, the flavorbot looks at three databases of information – recipe index, hedonic psychophysics (quantification of what flavors people like at the molecular level), and chemoinformatics (connecting what foods the molecular flavor is actually in).  To learn more, see the links below:

Category 3 (Books):  Ever heard of “Abechamycin”?  It’s not a new antibiotic….but it may be one day.  At Pfizer in 1956, an IBM 702 helped create a 198-page, 42,000 word book of potential chemical names as a way of spurring and accelerating the naming process for the many new drugs the firm introduced on an annual basis.  Learn more.

———————————————————————————

Related:

- By Julie Yamamoto, Program Manager, The Greater IBM Connection, and Paul Lasewicz, IBM Corporate Archivist

———————

The October 2013 theme for The Greater IBM Connection is ”creativity and innovation”, and The Greater IBM Connection will be sharing various tips, tools, and resources on this topic.